Transport Phenomena - Delft University of Technology

Sorted by YearSorted by First Author

Effects of Pressure and Fines Content on Bubble Diameter in a Fluidized Bed Studied Using Fast X-Ray Tomography

Effects of Pressure and Fines Content on Bubble Diameter in a Fluidized Bed Studied Using Fast X-Ray Tomography, G. C. Brouwer, E. C. Wagner, J. R. van Ommen, and R. F. Mudde. Chemical Engineering Journal 2012, 207  (SI), 711–717.

Download

[DOI] 

Abstract

Using a fast X-ray tomography setup the bubble size and velocity has been measured in a 25 cm diameter fluidized bed of Geldart B powder and a 24 cm bed of Geldart A powder. The average bubble size has been determined for a measurement period of 60 s. The resolution of this setup is about 4.5 mm per pixel at a rate of 250 reconstructions per second. It is possible to detect bubbles as small as 2.2 cm. The Geldart B powder consists of polystyrene particles with an average diameter of 607 gm and a bulk density of 625 kg/m(3). This bed was studied at pressures ranging from 1 to 5 bar. The superficial gas velocities varied from 12 to 32 cm/s for the atmospheric pressure measurements; for the highest pressure from 10 to 15 cm/s. The bubble size is significantly reduced at higher pressures for similar gas flows. The Geldart A powder consist of a base of aluminum oxide particles with an average diameter of 76 mu m and a bulk density of 680 kg/m(3). A varying amount of fines was added to these base particles for the different mixtures. The fines consist of aluminum oxide particles with an average diameter of 38 mu m and a bulk density of 620 kg/m(3). The fines contents varied from 0%(w) to 50%(w). An increase in fines content results in a clear reduction of the average bubble size. If the fines content is increased from 0%(w) to 50%(w) the average spherical equivalent bubble diameter is reduced by 20%. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

BibTeX

@article{ ISI:000311184500075,
Author = {Brouwer, G. C. and Wagner, E. C. and van Ommen, J. R. and Mudde, R. F.},
Title = {Effects of Pressure and Fines Content on Bubble Diameter in a Fluidized Bed Studied Using Fast X-Ray Tomography},
Journal = {Chemical Engineering Journal},
Year = {2012},
Volume = {207},
Number = {SI},
Pages = {711-717},
Month = {},
Note = {},
Abstract = {Using a fast X-ray tomography setup the bubble size and velocity has been measured in a 25 cm diameter fluidized bed of Geldart B powder and a 24 cm bed of Geldart A powder. The average bubble size has been determined for a measurement period of 60 s. The resolution of this setup is about 4.5 mm per pixel at a rate of 250 reconstructions per second. It is possible to detect bubbles as small as 2.2 cm. The Geldart B powder consists of polystyrene particles with an average diameter of 607 gm and a bulk density of 625 kg/m(3). This bed was studied at pressures ranging from 1 to 5 bar. The superficial gas velocities varied from 12 to 32 cm/s for the atmospheric pressure measurements; for the highest pressure from 10 to 15 cm/s. The bubble size is significantly reduced at higher pressures for similar gas flows. The Geldart A powder consist of a base of aluminum oxide particles with an average diameter of 76 mu m and a bulk density of 680 kg/m(3). A varying amount of fines was added to these base particles for the different mixtures. The fines consist of aluminum oxide particles with an average diameter of 38 mu m and a bulk density of 620 kg/m(3). The fines contents varied from 0\%(w) to 50\%(w). An increase in fines content results in a clear reduction of the average bubble size. If the fines content is increased from 0\%(w) to 50\%(w) the average spherical equivalent bubble diameter is reduced by 20\%. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
DOI = {10.1016/j.cej.2012.07.040},
ISSN = {1385-8947},
ResearcherID-Numbers = {van Ommen, Ruud/A-4119-2009},
ORCID-Numbers = {van Ommen, Ruud/0000-0001-7884-0323},
Unique-ID = {ISI:000311184500075},
}

Generated by bib2html.pl (written by Patrick Riley ) on Fri Jul 28, 2017 13:53:03


Last modified: July 28 2017. © Delft University of Technology - TP group 2012