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Thermohydrodynamics of an Evaporating Droplet Studied Using a Multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method

Thermohydrodynamics of an Evaporating Droplet Studied Using a Multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method, Ahad Zarghami and Harry E. A. Van den Akker. Physical Review E 2017, 95  (4), 043310.

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Abstract

In this paper, the thermohydrodynamics of an evaporating droplet is investigated by using a single-component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model. The phase change is applied to the model by adding source terms to the thermal lattice Boltzmann equation in such a way that the macroscopic energy equation of multiphase flows is recovered. In order to gain an exhaustive understanding of the complex hydrodynamics during evaporation, a single droplet is selected as a case study. At first, some tests for a stationary (non-)evaporating droplet are carried out to validate the method. Then the model is used to study the thermohydrodynamics of a falling evaporating droplet. The results show that the model is capable of reproducing the flow dynamics and transport phenomena of a stationary evaporating droplet quite well. Of course, a moving droplet evaporates faster than a stationary one due to the convective transport. Our study shows that our single-component model for simulating a moving evaporating droplet is limited to low Reynolds numbers.

BibTeX

@article{ ISI:000400239300007,
Author = {Zarghami, Ahad and Van den Akker, Harry E. A.},
Title = {Thermohydrodynamics of an Evaporating Droplet Studied Using a Multiphase Lattice Boltzmann Method},
Journal = {Physical Review E},
Year = {2017},
Volume = {95},
Number = {4},
Month = {},
Abstract = {In this paper, the thermohydrodynamics of an evaporating droplet is investigated by using a single-component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model. The phase change is applied to the model by adding source terms to the thermal lattice Boltzmann equation in such a way that the macroscopic energy equation of multiphase flows is recovered. In order to gain an exhaustive understanding of the complex hydrodynamics during evaporation, a single droplet is selected as a case study. At first, some tests for a stationary (non-)evaporating droplet are carried out to validate the method. Then the model is used to study the thermohydrodynamics of a falling evaporating droplet. The results show that the model is capable of reproducing the flow dynamics and transport phenomena of a stationary evaporating droplet quite well. Of course, a moving droplet evaporates faster than a stationary one due to the convective transport. Our study shows that our single-component model for simulating a moving evaporating droplet is limited to low Reynolds numbers.},
DOI = {10.1103/PhysRevE.95.043310},
Pages = {043310},
ISSN = {2470-0045},
EISSN = {2470-0053},
Unique-ID = {ISI:000400239300007},
}

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